Tag Archives: newspapers

Front pages reviewed at midnight: Wednesday 16 February 2011

The Guardian has an important scoop about the Iraq War, The Times has paedophiles, the Mail and the Telegraph follow up on today’s story about old age pensioners and The Independent has an interesting lead on oil.

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Front pages reviewed at midnight: Tuesday 15 February 2011

The Indy, Times and Telegraph lead with a new report by the NHS Ombudsman, the Guardian has an exclusive about environmentalists and the Mail moans about councillors’ pay.

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Front pages reviewed: Thursday 10 February 2011

The Times and The Guardian have Egypt, The Daily Mail launches a campaign to urge MPs to vote against the prison vote bill, The Telegraph has NHS reforms and The Indy again leads with phone hacking.

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Front pages reviewed at midnight: Friday 4 February 2011

The Guardian and the Indy are desperate not to put Egypt on the front page but have nothing better to replace it with, while The Times goes the other way and bumps Egypt up. The Telegraph continues to revel in its Wikileaks dump.

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Front pages reviewed at midnight: Thursday 3 February 2011

The Indy and The Guardian lead with Egypt, The Telegraph has some more Wikileaks and The Times has an interview with the country’s top family law judge.

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Front pages reviewed at midnight: Wednesday 2 February 2011

The Guardian, The Times and the Indy all lead with Mubarak but the Telegraph has a story that on any other night would lead the news bulletins.

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Front pages reviewed at midnight: Tuesday 1 February 2011

The Independent scoops the rest of the pack tonight (not often you can say that) with Robert Fisk securing the first full-length interview with the man most likely to take over from Mubarak in Egypt, Mohammed ElBaradei. The only other paper maybe worth a look in is the Telegraph which uses Wikileaks docs to reveal that ministers advised the Libyans on how to get the alleged Lockerbie bomber out of jail.

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Top ten front pages of 2010

Since this blog began in September we have seen some great front pages and some frankly awful ones. But today we celebrate only the best, with our rundown of the best front pages since we began.

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The EU, the SNP and student fees – why is the Mail not having a field day?

Guest Blog by Alex Rowley
 
Reaction to the tuition fees debate has been in the papers a lot recently. The UK government voted in favour of raising the fees to a minimum of £6,000 and maximum of £9,000 in exceptional cases. In Wales it was confirmed that these rises would not be taking place, in Scotland it is under review but still free and Northern Ireland may follow the Welsh lead of keeping fees the same for those resident there.

The EU has not been in the news recently but to jog your memory, institutions must charge EU students the same as local students. So while those from Gretna are charged the same as those from Guttenberg for attending the University of Aberdeen, those from Berwick-upon-Tweed are not.

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How cutting budgets might improve foreign news coverage

Last night I went to see the multi-award winning journalist Michela Wrong talk about working in sub-Saharan Africa. Chatham House Rules applied (i.e. everything was off the record and no quotes) but one thing she said got me thinking.

She mentioned that the serious cutbacks in foreign news reporting meant papers, broadcasters and agencies were no longer sending in Western correspondents but instead using local journalists. This, she said, might actually make the coverage better as they could provide local knowledge that the Westerner never can.

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